Kirsty

Value furk as profitable work

Value furk as profitable work
Most of my days are spent creating, catching up and having breakfast, lunch and dinner with clients who I consider friends, many of whom have become lifetime clients that I love having in my world. I believe this is a much more sustainable way of doing business than the traditional 'close the sale' ideology that the sales industry has been sold, where you are on the one-off treadmill and constantly looking for new business.

However, I remember feeling guilty at one point that I was so successful with such minimal effort. Initially, this didn’t feel right. After all, like many of us, I had been taught that I shouldn’t mix business with pleasure, that I “shouldn’t do business with friends” and old clichés like: “another day another dollar” and “life wasn’t meant to be easy”. 

Work was meant to feel hard, wasn’t it? And if I didn’t feel like I had worked hard, I would feel guilty. I may have made a lot more money by having fun and mixing business with pleasure, but part of me felt driven to continue to work even harder because I felt guilty that I was having too much fun.

If you have ever felt guilty that you are not working hard enough, it may stem from what is known as the ‘protestant work ethic’. Over time, we have been conditioned to feel an inner obligation and sense of duty to work. It has become part of our identity and how we value ourselves and if we don’t work hard enough, we may feel guilt, shame or consider ourselves unworthy.

I have learned to consider my coffee meetings and networking events as me being ‘hard at work’ and include this in my weekly schedule as prospecting time.  I now realise that the journey to success can be as difficult or as much fun as you choose it to be.  Because of this, I love my work and my days are filled taking a genuine interest in people’s lives and chatting away having a wonderful time and they call this work? Well, as you all know I call it #furk.
 
#Furk; Combining FUn and woRK and blurring the lines. It’s about integrating rather than compartmentalising and separating the two. In essence it is about doing what you LOVE with people that you love.
Last Updated on Monday, 07 March 2011 07:09